Wednesday, September 08, 2010

The people who influence you

As previously mentioned, I just returned from Dragon*Con, the largest Sci-Fi/Fantasy Con in the South East. The guest list for Dragon is always impressive. Big name TV/movie stars, best selling authors, and some of the best underground musicians are pretty much par for the course. Lines for events are sometimes blocks long and many rooms fill to capacity (and beyond, though then the fire marshals tend get rather irate). You'd pretty much have to be living under a rock (or, I guess, just not be a geek) to have never heard of at least a few of the guests. Whatever your particular flavor of geekdom, there is probably someone there that you're dying to hear speak and maybe get a signature and a photo. I'd almost guarantee that there is a guest in attendance whose work you respect greatly, and maybe there is someone whose work has influenced or inspired you.

This Dragon*Con, I had the opportunity to see one of those people who influenced and inspired me. And not only see her, but to talk to briefly and get a picture with said influential person. Who was this person? Well, you might have already recognized her from the photo, but for those of you who didn't, the person I'm referring to is Laurell K Hamilton, the author of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series and one of the forerunners of the Urban Fantasy genre as it exists today.  (NOTE: I know there is a lot of fan controversy about this series, but this blog post is not about that, so please keep comments positive and on topic.)

I discovered LKH and the Anita series when I was fourteen (this was in the mid-nineties, so the series wasn't yet highly inappropriate for a fourteen year old to read--well, unless you object to violence and language, I guess) and before discovering LKH, I was strictly a high fantasy girl. Oh, I'd read gothic paranormal novels like Dracula and Frankenstein (which were pretty much UF for their day) and I'd read Ann Rice's Vampire Chronicles, but nothing inspired a hunger for more of the genre in me like LKH's books did.

Of course, there really wasn't much more of the genre out there at the time.

P N Elrod's Vampire Files and Tanya Huff's Blood Books were on shelves, but that was about the extent of the genre that would eventually be called Urban Fantasy (and is even now mutating to a new name). Buffy didn't start airing until a year or two after I started reading LKH (and I actually didn't see any of it until years later when my college roommate decided it was all but blasphemous that I hadn't seen Buffy and arranged several marathon viewings.)  The show Forever Knight (which I was a huge fan of and is probably another influencing force behind me writing UF) had come and gone, but as far as I could find as a fourteen year old, that was the extent of the genre.

I was dabbling in writing by that point, but only high fantasy. In fact, prior to finding the Anita books (and I received the first three by mistake from the Sci-Fi Fantasy Bookclub--I wouldn't have picked them up on my own) I would have told you I wasn't interested in any book set in contemporary times. Give me castles and dragons--technology as advanced as a car or wrist watch was a deal breaker. Then I devoured the first few Anita Blake books and I was hooked. I wanted more, and it wasn't out there.

So I started writing my own.

Oh, don't get me wrong. I didn't stop writing high fantasy at that point. In fact, I still focused primarily on high fantasy until I finished college. (And like those high fantasy novels, I didn't finish any of my early UF stories.) I didn't begin focusing on UF until nearly a decade later when I wrote the novel which eventually became Once Bitten, and by that point, other UF giants such as Charlaine Harris, Jim Butcher, and Kim Harrison were already established.

But if I had to point to one single influential writer who hooked me on the genre, that writer would be Laurell K Hamilton.

I saw LKH at Dragon two years ago and attended almost every one of her panels (including one memorable panel where I thought she was about to throw down with one of the romance writers), but at that time I couldn't work up the nerve to talk to her. This year I saw her on several panels and even passed her in the halls a couple times, but I was too afraid I'd make a fool of myself to approach her.  Then, on the very last day of Dragon, probably two hours before I left, I saw her in the hall and finally worked up the nerve to talk to her. (Or maybe it wasn't nerve. I'd literally just walked out from giving blood when I spotted her and was a little light headed so 'just go for it' sounded plausible.)

I asked if I could get a picture with her, and told her that her books had inspired me to write and that I have an UF book (Grave Witch) being released from Roc next month. Then I gave her a very nervous hug and ran away, even more light headed--either from blood loss or nerves. I hope I didn't scare her and come off as a crazy fan girl, but how do you act and what do you say to someone whose work influenced you (especially during those formidable teenage years)? 

So, here is my question for you: Who has influenced and inspired you and how? (In any aspect of your life.) What would you say to them if you had a chance to meet them? Or, have you met that person? What did you do/say?

2 comments:

Genesia Komos said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Kalayna, I know exactly how you feel. I met Laurell when she came out earlier this year to CA. I went up to the microphone twice and asked as many questions as I could during the q & a portion. I was glad to know one of my favorite authors was as down to earth and funny as I expected. Then, when it came time to get up close and take a picture, I completely degenerated into a nervous mess. All I could manage to do was desperately blurt out, "I love your books!"

http://twitgoo.com/yjx47

Great blog post. You must divulge what Laurell almost threw down with that romance author about!